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2 North Riverside Plaza, #1400
Chicago, IL, 60606
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Rivet is a smart audio creation and distribution company. Our platform is state-of-the-art, combining award-winning interactive media content, voice technologies and artificial intelligence (AI) to enable you to get your stories heard everywhere. 

Blog Posts

Filtering by Category: How-to

Tips to make your podcast successful: An interview with Orbit Media's Andy Crestodina

James VanOsdol

What steps can you take to elevate your podcast? To help answer that question, we turn to Andy Crestodina, co-founder of Orbit Media in Chicago. Andy's a web strategist, author and marketer whose insights are must-reads for anyone in the digital space.

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Monetizing Your Podcast: Assigning a Value to the Show

James VanOsdol

I’ve struggled for a while with how to monetize my podcast. I don’t think it’s a stretch to say that (most) podcast creators aren’t used to hustling their creations for money. I know it’s easy to be overwhelmed by the notion of starting to sell your podcast. Who to pursue? How much to charge? What could it sound like?

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How to Aircheck Your Podcast (GUEST BLOG)

Seth Resler

In radio, there is a tried and true practice to help on-air talent up their game: Airchecking.

Airchecking is an exercise where radio DJs can get constructive feedback on their performance. Typically, on-air personalities sit down with their Program Directors and listen to a recording of a recent show together. The PD will offer insights into what the on-air personality is doing well and what they can do to improve.

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Covering press conferences or news-related events

Jennifer O'Neill

Extreme weather, traffic jams, limited parking and large crowds are just some of the many variables that can come into play when heading out to an event. Ideally, it's good to get there 15-30 minutes early. If it's a major event, you may even have to show up a few hours ahead of time.

Always have a bottle of water, a granola bar and a fully-charged cell phone; you may be at the scene much longer than anticipated. Extra clothing (if possible) is a good idea, too, and not just because of the weather. I had the misfortune of standing too close to a drunk person at one particular sporting event. He vomited, and my pants got sprayed. Yuck! Years ago, I also learned partway through a live radio interview that the candidate I was interviewing on election night was drunk. Always expect the unexpected.

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Top 5 things you need to broadcast on a budget

George

As an amateur podcaster with small pockets, I know how difficult making a quality audio program can be. I’ve spent a fair amount of money on high-quality accessories, but I still have nowhere close to a professional studio. Many people resort to what they have: Cell phones and laptops as microphones and “quiet spaces” like garages or basements as studios. While these work out just fine for some people, here’s my list of five things I see as "must-haves" for creating a broadcast-ready podcast or radio show:

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Your voice

James VanOsdol

When confronted with a live microphone, people tend to alter their voices to sound more "radio-like." If you're one of those people, stop it. Trust yourself to be yourself. "Radio voices" are cornball and inauthentic. You'll have a better shot of making a lasting impression by simply being you.

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What's the ideal length?

James VanOsdol

What's the optimal length for your content? This Adweek piece says 22 minutes is the sweet spot for podcasters. Then again, this site says to keep it under 15. The advice we give our team is to produce content that’s exactly as long as it’s interesting. If you’re bored, it’s a safe bet your listeners are, too. If you’re enthusiastic and engaged, keep on keepin’ on.

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Where should you record?

James VanOsdol

Unless you're specifically trying to include ambient noise in a story or piece of content, we recommend recording somewhere quiet. Most non-industry audio creators don't have a tricked-out, soundproofed, acoustically-perfect home studio. You can tip the odds in your favor by retreating to the most quiet place in your home (smaller rooms, even closets, tend to work well).

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